Removal of Stains

If garments become contaminated with flammable substances, they should be removed immediately and replaced with clean flame resistant apparel. Either home or industrial laundering may successfully remove most types of both flammable and non flammable soils. However, home laundry detergents may not successfully remove some types of soil found in industry, especially heavy greases and oily soils. If flammable soils are not completely removed, the flame resistance of the garment may be compromised.

Flammable materials are for the most part volatile substances that dissipate into the atmosphere, for example, gasoline. Stains remaining after laundering on the other hand are either unremoved contaminants or, more likely, simply discoloration of the fabric.

It may be difficult to determine that flammable soils have been completely removed, but indicators would include the presence of stains and/or odors after laundering. However staining alone is not an indication that the soil has not been adequately removed. If it appears that the garments may still be contaminated after home wash, laundering at a local commercial or industrial laundry may be required. Dry cleaning may be used to remove oils and greases. Finally, if questions remain Bulwark will conduct flame resistant testing of the garment in question to determine its flame resistance. Please be aware that this is a destructive test and the garment will be destroyed.

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How flame-resistant fabrics work

Flame-resistant (FR) fabrics and garments are intended to resist ignition, prevent the spread of flames away from the immediate area of high heat impingement, and to self-extinguish almost immediately upon removal of the ignition source.

Normal work apparel will ignite and continue to burn if exposed to an ignition source such as flame or electric arc. Everyday fabrics will continue to burn until they are extinguished or all flammable material is consumed.